The Best Acts at The Great Escape 2016 (that I saw)

Sorry for the quiet spell on the blog, it's been quite the time... I'm back from The Great Escape (my ninth time) in one piece, more or less, and in lieu of a full day by day recount of the weekend and the thirty odd bands I saw I'm going to cherry pick the absolute best. I'm also going to stop waffling and get on with it.

Hyphen Hyphen
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Friday at Brighthelm

Yes. This was the one TGE 2016. 

Hyphen Hyphen are a French electro pop quartet whom appear to be pretty popular in their home country (so much so that they won best live act at the 2016 edition of their Brit Awards equivalent - I now know why) but I'd never heard of until looking for a band to end my night on Friday, I went with Hyphen Hyphen simply because I'd already seen Ary three times this year and their description on the festival app (which was much improved this year, just missing Spotify integration and defaulting to the correct time on the line-up page in my opinion) sounded interesting. The show was their live UK debut and will certainly not be their last, surely soon to be singled out by bigger and better blogs than this as a future crossover artist (with 1.3M views on their "Just Need Your Love" video perhaps they already have).

It took about a minute to fall in love with the band, emblazoned in warpaint and radiant smiles and just about long enough for front-woman Santa to catapult from the side of the stage and launch into the first of the bands hypnotising songs. I've seen some commanding leads in my time and Santa immediately joins the select best, filled with a boundless energy that sees her catapult around the stage quicker than anybody I've ever seen in my life and coupled with this incredibly powerful voice, each song filled with soaring, ethereal melodies, glistening 80's keys and tribal drums and after half an hour passes in the blink of an eye I'm itching for more. Unfortunately it is 2am and the venues security are quickly chucking everyone out of the room before we can even give them the reaction they deserved.

This is how to put on a show.

I'm later asked to describe them and the best I can muster is London Grammar on acid, that'll do for now. Go and discover them yourselves UK.

Muna
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Saturday at Coalition

Another band making their debut UK performance this weekend and another set to hit the headlines, LA's Muna performed a ridiculously accomplished set of their flickering, 80's indebted pop-rock. They also received the absolute biggest reception of any band I saw at the years festival. It was similar to last years Aurora show in the same venue, the audience immediately putty in the hands of a band clearly on their way to bigger things (it probably helped that the band clearly had a handful of friends in front rows whom knew every word to every track).

"Loudspeaker" is a song I featured on this blog a year ago, the name of their recently released EP and the bands closing track. It's glistening dark pop filled with crystalline vocals and the perfect summation of the girls sound, undoubtedly likely to draw immediate Haim comparisons although much more cinematic with each polished guitar hook, pulsating synth beat and rich vocal washes over you with a rich, warming glow. You feel like you're starring in your own 80's montage. 

I'm pretty soon making an unscheduled trip back to my nearby hotel room to drop of the bands vinyl.

Dream Wife
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Friday at Photomatic

Packed into a tiny shop in the lanes, handed a free beer and sweating profusely; pretty much the ideal situation to finally catch Dream Wife live I'd say.

The Brighton based band did not disappoint in their home town with a raw, shrill and energetic show that reminded me of a slightly more pop Dolores Haze (whom I'd caught up with again after seeing twice, quite brilliantly at By:Larm in March the night before). Rakel Mjöll's vocal changing from innocent pop sweetness to snarling, ferocious bite in the blink of an eye amongst driving grunge rhythms, killer pop hooks and chaotic drums, the packed room lap it up and my friends who see the band at one of their other shows return with similarly positive reviews. 

Noisy, aggressive, poppy, brilliant.

Julia Jacklin
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Thursday at Komedia and Friday at The Haunt

I have one simple question to ask you. How the fuck had I not heard of Julia Jacklin until the day before The Great Escape? Not only seemingly one of the talked about acts of SXSW this year (and soon to be the same after her shows at TGE) but every drop of her music couldn't be any more 'me' if she had come into my house, taken my record collection and tried to replicate it. 

Both of her sets I catch are chocked full with wounded country ballads that are akin to Angel Olsen and Caitlin Rose, filled with stirring electric guitars from her wonderful backing band (when the sound desk broke at The Haunt and caused a twenty minute delay they took to some impromptu jamming - I doubt Julia will remember the second half too fondly, the mix was certainly not as you'd like) and intimate, honest lyrics.

"Pool Party' closed both sets and is Julia's debut single, it sums up the shows, a combination of swelling instrumentation and devastating voice that makes you linger after her every word, it's achingly pretty, beautifully sad, outrageously brilliant. 

She plays in London again tomorrow before returning in September. That's pretty good news.

Al Bairre
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Thursday at The Prince Albert

2015's TGE highlight Al Bairre return a year later to pretty much the same reaction, 'oh fucking yes, this is awesome'.

The Prince Albert stage is tiny, it doesn't lend itself too well for a band as boundless as Al Bairre but it's okay, bouncy indie-pop knows no boundaries and soon enough the afternoon crowd is nodding along to each rhythm and smiling to every infectious, exhilarating track. The good news is this year I know the words to most of the tracks and I'm left grinning like a slightly mad cat, a slightly drunk cat too as I'd perhaps had a few too many beers in the afternoon beforehand.

I said it last year, I'll say it again. Go and listen to this band now. Two sold-out shows in London either side of the festival signal people are. 

The Big Moon
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Saturday at Komedia

I think this is my fifth time seeing The Big Moon already (not my last) and easily the best, a new track kicks off the set and it's brilliant. It sets the tone for a great 'matinee' show to please a packed early Saturday crowd.

Fun and engaging, polished and charismatic, the quartet whirl through half an hour's worth of brilliant guitar pop, there's killer hooks at almost every turn, plenty of shredding guitar duals and enough singalong choruses to pack a stadium.

With tracks like "Cupid" and "Sucker" already in their arsenal, the future keeps on getting rosier for this outstanding quartet. 

Dagny
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Thursday at Komedia

Now signed to Island Records (which will hopefully mean we'll have some more music to share soon) Dagny is surely a shoe-in to appear on pretty much every 'Sound of 2017' list and now I've seen her a couple of times, I'm happy to be along for the ride.

There's an additional guitarist at Komedia in comparison to the show I caught at By:Larm and it only adds to the dynamic performance. I love the fact she employs a real band around her, I do struggle with singers and laptops, the live band not only makes for a compelling live show but adds so much 'feeling' to the music over a digital backing. I'm running out of things to say about "Backbeat" so I'll just say this, magic.

Aldous Harding
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Friday at Paganini Ballroom

Playing exactly the same venue as twelve months before Aldous Harding is the real deal. It's a set that's entirely made up of new music from her amusingly titled forthcoming record Party and one that beguiles from start to end.

Her music is fascinating, the first four track all see Aldous on her traditional acoustic guitar playing long-lasting finger-plucked melodies filled with wounded tales of personal battles and losses before she switches to vocal duties alongside a friend playing keys and changes key completely, from heartbreaking whispers and spine-tingling emotions to strong, defiant bellowing and dramatic arm movements which both have the audience equally transfixed throughout. The set, as the year before, is littered with Aldous' dark humour and unnerving faces, you aren't quite sure if theatrical or real, I think it's probably both. 

Don't miss her when she returns to the UK later in the year.

Ekkah
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Saturday at Synergy Centre

I already knew that Ekkah knew how to get the party started, now I know they can end one too. Ending Saturday with a typically disco-laced set in the strange surroundings of Synergy Centre to a healthy crowd who danced away like the venue was still the night club it was some years ago (and I can remember go to when I visited a friend at uni some dozen years ago). 

"Last Chance to Dance" sums it up perfectly, just listen to that bass-line. Its funky throwback melody moulded with infectious hand-claps and ultra smooth vocal hooks sound like the love child of The Jackson 5 and 80's Madonna and the result is just is good. "

The absolute highlight though is the look on everyone's face as they enter the building after being ID'ed (and I'm talking everyone, especially Robin at Breaking More Waves). 

Aldous Harding #3 - I'm So Sorry

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Year-end at work cost me two gigs this year, last week I got home at half nine and so a trip to East London to see Eliza Shaddad was impossible and on Monday night I got in slightly earlier but completely drained and so missed seeing what I know would have been a brilliant gig by New Zealand’s Aldous Harding. I'm taking comfort in the fact that Aldous is playing at The Great Escape for the second consecutive year (I did see her there in 2015) and that she recently uploaded a new track to her soundcloud (can US readers actually listen to soundcloud streams posted without a subscription now?).

The track "I'm So Sorry" sums up her bewitching talents perfectly, a masterclass in restrained melancholy with little more than finger-plucked acoustic and mesmerising vocals enough to send shivers down your spine, immediately Aldous pulls you into her haunting world and won’t let go, here she croons with a fragile vocal filled with sadness against a soft and gloomy instrumentation. As I was almost two years ago when I discovered her music, I'm smitten.

The Great Escape 2015 - Preview (Ten acts to see part one)

The Great Escape  Official Website

It's incredibly less than a week until one of my favourite weekends of the year, The Great Escape. This will be the eighth time I've descended on Brighton for a weekend of new music by the sea. Let's hope it isn't quite as windy as last year! 

This year has flown by and my research hasn't been quite as good as normal, there's still way more music than you can possibly listen to and just three days to see it. Over the next two posts I'll feature ten acts that I recommend you take time out of your schedule for and investigate.

I've historically done a preview of the festival and featured a few tips each year, I'm just going to cut and paste a few bullet points from those below to potentially give any newbies an insight:

  • Some 'new' venues turn out to be old ones renamed so watch your step. This year The Hope is now The Hope & Ruin, Patterns is what used to be Audio and The Hydrant is now called Bleach, to name but three.
  • If you do plan on going to one of the 'hyped' artist gigs, the advice is simple, get there early. If you plan on waltzing into the venue two minutes before stage time, you will be mistaken and you will spend the entire gig standing outside wishing you were somewhere else.
  • The Great Escape is a vast, widespread festival (if you've never been, be warned that Concorde 2 is a LONG way along the front, don't leave five minutes to get there).
  • Don’t forget the festival sister showpiece The Alternative Escape when you are investigating bands you want to see.
  • Brighton has abysmal phone reception, expect not to be able to load up your apps for up-to-date news. Take a piece of paper and pen (and the festival planner PDFs) with the acts you want to see on it. If you can get wi-fi then Twitter is usually the best place to find out about secret, last minute shows (of which there are usually many).
  • It's a marathon not a sprint; The Great Escape lasts three days and nights, don't go too big on Thursday and end up missing half the acts you want to see on Friday because you are in an alcohol riddled stupor. 
  • Go explore Brighton. There's more to TGE than just music, go for a walk around the lanes, find brilliant coffee shop (not Starbucks) and eat at Pompoko.

Onwards with the first five of my ten acts to see at the 2015 edition of The Great Escape (what is the festivals tenth birthday). The who sections of these previews are copied from The Great Escape (where applicable) so yeah, not my words!

1. Aldous Harding (Facebook)

Who? 
New Zealand singer-songwriter Aldous Harding making her debut in the UK.

Where? 
ST GEORGES CHURCH
THURSDAY 14th May 2015 8:15pm - 8:45pm
PAGANINI BALLROOM
THURSDAY 14th May 2015 2:15pm - 3:00pm

Why? 
Aldous Harding released her debut album via home-label Lyttelton Records last April nd soon grew to become a cult favourite amongst lovers of lush, retro folk and otherworldly voices. The record is a wonder, a dark-folk album with vivid lyrical themes and fragile vocals.

The album's opener "Stop Your Tears" was the track that introduced me to Aldous Harding (aka Hannah) and instantly pulls you into an alternate world of genteel beauty. A beguiling, acoustic guitar provides the platform for much of the album and here its soft plucks and haunting backing harmonies are the only accompaniment to Hannah's voice, a timeless, natural tone which is capable of making the hairs on your neck stand on end.

"Hunter" is a sumptuous feast of rich musical landscape and fragile, haunting vocals from the get-go,  blending a style not dissimilar from Joanna Newsom with touches of Joni Mitchell, as subtle, weaving melody and intriguing lyrics full of lovely imagery and extraordinary beauty carry the listener off to places warm and brilliant.

2. Jagaara (Facebook)

Who?
Sibling trio from London whom incorporate a mix of folk, rock and electronica into their songs while continuing to experiment until they captured the essence their unique sound; Soaring hypnotic vocals, giving way to beautifully arranged, atmospheric instrumentation.

Where?
PATTERNS – DOWNSTAIRS
THURSDAY 14th May 2015 7:30pm - 8:00pm
DOME STUDIO THEATRE
SATURDAY 16th May 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm

Why?
One of my 'fifteen for '15' Jagaara welcome 2015 with their first new music of the year, "In The Dark".

The track sees the trio, siblings if you didn't already know, extend the formula used to smouldering effect on their impeccable debut "Faultline". slow-motion soundscapes that rise with brooding intent amongst gorgeously tight harmonies and backed by darkly atmospheric percussion. It's simply to-die-for.

3. Aurora (Facebook)

Who? 
Aurora, an eighteen year old resident of Bergen, Norway whom effortlessly creates music that somehow balances the line between haunting and adorable. From first listen, the fact that she defines her music as ‘dark pop’ begins to make perfect sense.

Where?
SPIEGELPUB (HUB STAGE)
FRIDAY 15th May 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
COALITION
FRIDAY 15th May 2015 8:15pm - 8:45pm

Why?
"Runaway" is Aurora's (who's dropped the use of her surname Aksnes since I last posted about her), one of Norway's brightest musical stars (and they have many) latest and best track to date. it sees her pure, mesmerising vocal joined by ebbing and flowing instrumentation that pares her voice perfectly, rising from a glacial, softening beginning to a swooping, soaring chorus full of emotion and strength. 

I'm not the biggest music video fan I'll be honest, I rarely sit and concentrate through one but the video for "Runaway" is magical, both beautiful and compelling, it sees what must have been a freezing cold Aurora standing in an absolutely gorgeous snow-filled landscape and later throwing what can only be called 'shapes' with big, wide opened eyes that pierce straight through you.

Since "Runaway" comes "Running With The Wolves" a big, bold pop hit in the making, it grows with magnificent splendour around big, booming choruses, icy synth drops and Aurora's crystalline vocals. Glamorously dark and amorously seductive, it's a potent combination. 

4. Pins (Facebook)

Who? 
PINS are Faith, Anna, Lois,and Sophie. PINS mix together post punk, fuzzed up garage, and rock and roll.  They have created a distinct sound, and secured their place in the burgeoning Manchester new music scene.

Where?
GREEN DOOR STORE
THURSDAY 14th May 2015 10:00pm - 10:30pm
DOME STUDIO THEATRE
FRIDAY 15th May 2015 3:15pm - 3:45pm

Why?
Pins have cleverly picked the lead two tracks from their second album Wild Nights (due June 8th via Bella Union). First track "Too Little Too Late" offered a salivating insight into a progressive sound, a slowly unwinding number that saw synths join the Manchester bands arsenal, brooding and enrapturing in equal measure amongst typically piercing words.

The second peek at Wild Nights is "Young Girls", a looser track that's possibly the most accessible song they've shared to date, full of breezy guitar melodies, tight vocal harmonies and wistful romanticism, it's the sort of track you'd have on repeat as you are leaving home for the first ever time determined to never look back and fully of hopeless optimism.  

If you think these tracks are good, just wait until you hear "Oh Lord" live. 

5. Siv Jakobsen (Facebook)

Who?
Siv’s music is beautifully mellow, much like diary-entries - filled with melancholy and an almost brutal honesty.

Where?
THE FISHBOWL (Alternative Escape)
FRIDAY 15th May 2015 4:00pm
MARWOOD CAFE (Alternative Escape)
SATURDAY 16th May 2015 5:00pm

Why?
Siv Jakobsen is probably my favourite discovery of 2015 so far. The Norwegian singer-songwriter's track "How We Used To Love" emits this spine-tingling stream of emotion that gets me every time, it's easily one of most beautiful, affecting tracks of the year. The good news is that Siv's follow-up "Dark" is just as good, bringing a similar sense of magical melancholy to the fore.

"Dark" is devastatingly sad and overwhelmingly beautiful; sparse, still instrumentation plucks straight at your heart-strings with Siv's pure, spellbinding vocal resonating around intimate acoustic guitars and luscious string flourishes. Loneliness sure never sounded so good.

Albums of 2014 #9 - Aldous Harding - Aldous Harding

Aldous Harding 
Aldous Harding 
Lyttelton Records. Released April 7th.

Aldous Harding, a New Zealand based singer-songwriter released her debut album via home-label Lyttelton Records back in April and soon grew to become a cult favourite amongst lovers of lush, retro folk and otherworldly voices. The record is a wonder, a dark-folk album with vivid lyrical themes and fragile vocals.

The album's opener "Stop Your Tears" was the track that introduced me to Aldous Harding (aka Hannah) and instantly pulls you into an alternate world of genteel beauty. A beguiling, acoustic guitar provides the platform for much of the album and here its soft plucks and haunting backing harmonies are the only accompaniment to Hannah's voice, a timeless, natural tone which is capable of making the hairs on your neck stand on end.

There's more instrumentation behind "Titus Groan" which with rich guitars and strings is the musical equivalent of big comforting hug whilst the darkest and most devastating track of all is the stunning "No Peace", a purposely slow track that hits hard with raw, emotive power and another highlight is Aldous' word-play on the fantastic "Beast". 

"Hunter" is a sumptuous feast of rich musical landscape and fragile, haunting vocals from the get-go,  blending a style not dissimilar from Joanna Newsom with touches of Joni Mitchell, as subtle, weaving melody and intriguing lyrics full of lovely imagery and extraordinary beauty carry the listener off to places warm and brilliant.

Find some time for yourself in a darkly lit room (ideally with a nice glass of whiskey) and immerse yourself in Aldous Harding below for here's a talent that can't stay hidden for long. 

The Best Tracks of 2014 So Far (Part One)...

It's the mid-point of the year so I thought what better time for me to join in with the endless 'best tracks of the year so far' type posts... As you're reading this I'm probably just about getting home from Glastonbury but in no fit state to blog, so this post is a pre-write... I won't waffle too much, just copy my initial comments on tracks and add clips / link so you can listen to my twenty one favourite tracks of 2014 so far (it was twenty but I remember one I missed!). Eleven below in this post with ten more following in part two in precisely one minutes time. As ever with a list, it's ever-changing and I've probably forgot a couple of tracks too!

Before pedantic comments come out, a couple of these could technically be 2013 tracks but they are new to me in 2014, that's all that matters...

21. Tennis - Never Work For Free

...a slice of infectious, 80's leaning pure candy-pop propelled by a repeating drum beat, breezy guitars and shiny synth lines, it gives Alaina Moore's the freedom to soar with her timeless sounding vocal. The result is instant love and smiles.



20. Marissa Nadler - Dead City Emily

...sitting in the same realms of dark melancholy "Dead City Emily" is equally rewarding, with a pretty guitar melody creating a serenely beautiful mood around a soft soothing vocal, it's the sort of thing dreams are made of, comforting you like a warming blanket on a chilly, cold night. 



19. Ottilia - Siren

"Siren" is as minimal as they come, much likes last years "and then he said" demo and causes goosebumps with little more than Ottilia's woozy, lovelorn voice, the repeated, haunted vocal of "Don't go home with me, I'm a siren" and the lullaby echoes of an acoustic guitar, it's all that is needed to be carried away by this intoxicating, emotive beauty.



18. Abbey Bowden - Dust

"Dust", recorded live for Basement Sessions, sees Abbey sitting in a dimly lit room with pictures of singers hanging on the walls alone with her guitar. What comes to pass over the next four minutes is as cathartic experience as music can bring, a real send shivers down your spine moment as Abbey's soulful, emotive vocal purrs over delicate finger-plucked acoustic, utterly, utterly transfixing.




17. Layla - Black Mud

"Black Mud" aims to hit at your emotions, that much becomes clear after mere seconds as piano twinkles are joined by a string orchestra and Layla's soulful voice, they ebb and flow in perfect harmony with the instrumentation, one moment delicate, tender and pure, the next strong, passionate flourishes. The result leaves me swooning all over.



16. Ice Cream Cathedral - The Swans

A bizarre yet incredible single "The Swans" Immediately takes the trios self-defined genre of 'space pop' to the next level with a video that sees the band on an intergalactic journey across the universe propelled by subterranean beats and dreamy, Blade Runner esque atmosphere. It's not just Anja T. Lahrmann's breathy, soothing vocals that draws instant comparison with Annie Clark's but the magical sonic palette that "The Swans" follows, deliciously offbeat, eccentric and unpredictable, woozy synths are complemented by soaring guitars and all manner of 'space' effects and then at the four minute mark the bizarre turns into the unfathomable when the video sees the trio arrive on a barren looking planet inhabited by gigantic dogs (really) as the track morphs into an elongated instrumental ending of stark instrumentation and galloping beats. Quite the introduction!



15. Alexandra Stewart - I Grow

The skeletal beauty "I Grow" is led by melancholic piano and understated instrumentation which beguiles around a soft, dreamy atmosphere and Alex's soft, luscious vocal. The sort of voice that carries your mind away and here I'm left with my eyes closed and transported to somewhere as beautiful as the artwork that comes supplied on the soundcloud link. After three and a half minutes the track surprises, morphing from plaintive piano-ballad to something akin to a slow-motion Dirty Projectors at their finest, with ambient guitar shimmers and pared-down drums closing the track with the repeated whispers of the title. Absolutely gorgeous is this and that will do just fine for me today.



14. Eliot Sumner - Information

A surging drum march drives the synth-and-strings track forward with gorgeous shimmering guitars dueling with korg keys, it's Toy-esque both in terms of its dense, extended Motorik rhythms and progressive, glistening melody. "Information" keeps on giving throughout its seven minute duration, Eliot's soaring, impassioned vocal is just the icing on the cake.



13. Aldous Harding - Hunter

"Hunter" is taken from Aldous' self-titled debut album and now comes backed with a rather fittingly chilly, brooding video. The track is the sumptuous feast of rich musical landscape and fragile, haunting vocals from the get-go, Aldous blends a style not dissimilar from Joanna Newsom with touches of Joni Mitchell, with subtle, weaving melody and intriguing lyrics full of lovely imagery and extraordinary beauty carrying off to places warm and brilliant. It's just a shame you have to get on with your real life after. Here's a talent that can't stay hidden for long.



12. Hunt - Reset My Bones

Entwined around the poem "Jellyfish" by Andrea Gibson the track is heady mix of melody, emotion and beauty. It begins with a slow, longing introduction, built around a fuzzy bass line, metronomic drums and shimmering guitars before climaxing with a luscious crescendo of post rock noise and atmosphere and gorgeous, hazy vocal harmonies, light and dark merge effortlessly and my heart is instantly melted. Those drums at the end too...



11. First Aid Kit - Cedar Lane

Cedar Lane" is a rich, sumptuous beauty with slide guitar melody and heart melting vocals, just the sort of thing we've become accustomed to from the duo.

Aldous Harding #2 - Hunter

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Aldous Harding is a New Zealand singer-songwriter whom I 'introduced' here a couple of months back after a recommendation came to me from fellow Kiwi's French For Rabbits (who I've since had the pleasure of meeting and seeing live). Yet besides a blossoming reputation in her native country you'd probably be forgiven for not having heard Aldous (real name Hannah) before, however in the infamous words of Lemar, if there's any justice, that will surely soon change (and I'm here to do my small part)...

"Hunter" is taken from Aldous' self-titled debut album (which is available to download / purchase now via Lyttleton Records - a decision you will not regret) and now comes backed with a rather fittingly chilly, brooding video. The track is the sumptuous feast of rich musical landscape and fragile, haunting vocals from the get-go, Aldous blends a style not dissimilar from Joanna Newsom with touches of Joni Mitchell, with subtle, weaving melody and intriguing lyrics full of lovely imagery and extraordinary beauty carrying off to places warm and brilliant. It's just a shame you have to get on with your real life after. Listen below and share with your friends, here's a talent that can't stay hidden for long.

Aldous Harding - New Music "Introducing"

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I've got French For Rabbits to thank for this introduction, Aldous Harding is a New Zealand based singer-songwriter whom has just released her debut album via home-label Lyttelton Records and if there's is any justice it will shortly become a cult favourite amongst lovers of lush, retro folk and otherworldly voices.

I'm not very good at album reviews, so I've picked three tracks to focus on here, the album's opener "Stop Your Tears" was the track that introduced me to Aldous Harding (aka Hannah) and instantly pulls you into an alternate world of genteel beauty. A beguiling acoustic guitar provides the platform for much of the album and here its soft plucks and haunting backing harmonies are the only accompaniment to Hannah's voice, a timeless, natural tone which is capable of making the hairs on your neck stand on end.

There's more instrumentation behind "Titus Groan" which with rich guitars and strings is the musical equivalent of big comforting hug whilst the darkest and most devastating track of all is the stunning "No Peace", a purposely slow track that hits hard with raw, emotive power. Find some time for yourself in a darkly lit room (ideally with a nice glass of whiskey) and immersive yourself in Alodous Harding below.

French For Rabbits are due in the UK soon, any chance of stowing away in their luggage?!